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A solo trip to Ireland's North West

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  • A solo trip to Ireland's North West

    I’m just back from an 11 day solo trip to Ireland’s North West and Northern Ireland. This was my first experience visiting Ireland, my first time playing links courses, and my first time doing a solo trip. What follows is a random gathering of notes on courses, golf, traveling in Ireland, and other random ideas which may or may not be of any use or consequence to you.

    Firstly, I should start by thanking and blaming Tom Coyne for inspiration for the trip. If you haven’t already done so, read “A Course Called Ireland.” It’s a great story focused not on golf, but on the journey he took to which anyone can relate. Kevin Markham also had a hand in pushing me out the door thanks to his amazing collection of pictures of golf in Ireland. He wrote the complete guide to all courses in Ireland which would be a useful tool, if there was an ebook copy. Kevin's Blog [Links to Kevin's flickr pages of each course below as I still haven't uploaded all of mine, and he has a far better camera and is actually a pro.]

    Getting to Ireland
    I flew in to Dublin Airport on United via Newark from Toronto – it was an aeroplan “free” flight, and going on United saved me $300 over Air Canada. Other good options are Belfast or the smaller Shannon Airport. All three have many flights direct from the US, Shannon being small means you can save a lot of time arriving and departing. For direct flights from Toronto, you’re pretty much stuck with Dublin.

    Getting around Ireland
    Unless you bring your own car there on a boat, you’re going to rent one in Ireland. I had initially booked an economy car – VW Polo or Ford Fiesta – but the Polo’s back seats didn’t really fold flat; the only way my clubs were going to get in there was in the back seat. I paid the extra €30 to upgrade to a compact – VW golf (or Ford Focus, Volvo V40, Opel something or other). I could’ve gotten away with the economy car, but my tolerance for anything annoying was weakened on the flight over. An economy would be a tight fit for 2, but workable; a compact could possibly fit 3 and comfortably fit 2, with golf stuff of course. If you’ve got a solid travel case, that makes things very tough and means you’d need a compact for 2 and even larger for 3 people.

    Irish roads, especially away from big cities, are tight. A full size car will have very little space to maneuver on the tighter roads - the R and L category roads (regional and local) are not advisable for large cars driven by those with heart issues. Most of those roads can fit 2 smaller vehicles; 1 cm out of place and you’ll have a meeting of mirrors or of mirror and hedge. Personally, I had no problem with driving on the left and shifting gears with the left hand. Automatic car charges are through the roof.

    To navigate around, I used my phone with Navmii – a GPS app with preloaded maps. It did a good job of getting me where I wanted to go and of calling out the roundabout exits to take. You could bring your own GPS, but that’s another thing to bring in the carry-on.

    A warning about Irish Car Hire prices. In the Republic, the business is largely unregulated. I was initially quoted a rental price of €45 for an economy for the trip. Being an OCD analyst, I did a little digging to find out what I was missing, as that price just made no sense. What was not included – premium location charge €26 (even though booking to pick up at the Airport, you still pay an extra fee), CDW waiver fee €30 (fee to waive the provider’s insurance – only available to Canadian Visa card holders; yes, it’s a fee, to waive another fee; the CDW insurance costs are more than the entire rental cost and the coverage is bad compared to your credit card, so waive the CDW, but expect to pay a fee), credit card fee €5. So with taxes, my €45 rental actually came to €145. Luckily, I knew this in advance, so wasn’t about to lose it on the nice lady at Hertz.

    Understanding the Irish
    Accents aside, and they can be tough to comprehend at times, certain words and sayings need to be understood in order to fully enjoy your travels.

    “Craic” – pronounced “crack” – means atmosphere and good time. If you tell an Irishman/woman that you’re looking for good craic, they’ll point you to a pub or other such venue for a good time. Asking the same question in Canada or the US is likely to get you arrested, or at least kicked out the clubhouse.

    “Not expecting any weather” – it may or may not rain. Likely, it will rain, but not a lot, more of a light drizzle or mist.
    “A little rain” – it will rain. Pack your full waterproofs (mine were always in my bag). This side of the ocean, “a little rain” would have golfers cancelling tee times and asking for rain checks. Irish courses don’t know what a rain check is.
    “Some rain” or “A bit of weather” – put all your electronics in two plastic bags, put on the full rain kit, make sure you have dry clothes in your car. Your water proofs will keep you from drowning, that is all. On this side of the ocean, “a bit weather” would have stores cleared of batteries, water bottles, and generators. The Irish enjoy the extra challenge.
    “Downpour” – go to high ground. It will rain such as you’ve never seen it. The best showerheads cannot match a proper Irish downpour. No one plays in a downpour, not even the Irish. Should you know of one coming, build a large boat 300 cubits in length and gather two of each animal.

    “No wind” – a light breeze – 1-2 club effect into the wind.
    “Little windy” – really windy – 3-5 club difference, aim 30 degrees away from your target, hit it low.
    “Windy” – do not wear baggy clothes and do not use a club with more loft than a 6 iron. “Windy” conditions would cause forced evacuations of Florida and the Carolinas.

    “Rough” – what we may call fescue over here. Unmaintained areas of the course featuring a mix long grasses, moss, weeds, sharp little grasses that will stab you, and other random plants. If you put a ball in the rough, you’ll need a search party. Irish and Swiss golfers seem to be the best at finding balls in the rough. Getting out of the rough is a different story.

    “We’ll fix that round in the pub” – you will drink until you can’t remember playing golf and the incomprehensible guy at the bar starts making sense.

    “A long drive away” – anything more than 30 minutes is considered far. The fact that I drove from Dublin airport to Strandhill (3 hours) and played golf in one day was incomprehensible to most.

    "Full Irish Breakfast" - if offered this and you say yes, you must eat all of it, even the black pudding (don't ask what's in it). A pig has given its life, and a chicken has sacrificed two of its young so that you may have your 1000+ calorie meal. Leaving any food on the plate will insult the cook and the entire island.

    Playing in Ireland
    No Ranges – most courses have no practice ranges as we do here. The area is available; however, you have to provide your own balls. I made sure I knew where some real ranges were enroute and near the courses I’d play in case I needed a tune up.

    Rough – so you’re in the rough, ok, put that 6 iron down NOW! Are your arms as big as Jason Day’s? Have you practiced hitting shots out of thick weeds 30cm above / below your feet while balancing delicately on the two toes that have grip? Use a wedge, put the ball on the fairway, no one wants to see you cry after swinging at the ball five times.

    Putting out and marking – all the players I joined were very careful about order of play on the green. They rarely tapped in unless it was inside a foot. That’s a matter of etiquette that is best followed so as not to irritate the locals.

    Weather
    It rains in Ireland, it’s windy sometimes. Dress and play appropriately and you’ll be fine. Two pairs of golf shoes are ideal – lets them dry out from sweat and any water between rounds.
    For my visit, most days were around 15. It rained just about every day, but it was usually short lived and very light rain.

    Timing
    The high season runs mid-May to labour day. In the region I visited and at the time I went, it was very quiet. Even though the courses I played are top rated, I actually played 1.5 rounds solo and had to wait to find a playing partner at other times. With a larger group, that could mean that scheduling is much easier.

    Region
    I chose the Northwest as it’s cheaper and less crowded. As a single, I didn’t want to be stuck behind a tour bus. The choice meant that I couldn’t play from a single hub – in the Southwest, you could hit pretty much everything staying in Tralee. That doesn’t mean I was driving 3 hours a day – most days I kept it to 2 hours max. I stayed in Enniscrone for 5 nights, then at a different spot each night until my last two nights in Portrush. I probably could have consolidated a couple of those stops into one, but I was pretty much playing by ear at that point. I only had one round booked the entire trip – my time at Royal Portrush; so, that meant I could be flexible. Getting a time at Lahinch, Tralee, and Ballybunion would have been very tough. I had no trouble getting a time where I played – quite the opposite as I had a challenge finding playing partners.

    The second factor affecting my choice had to do with the North and West Coast Links North and West Coast Links. A member at any one of those clubs enjoys half priced green fees at any other club. I was able to join Enniscrone as an overseas member on an annual membership for €300 – that ended up saving me nearly €650 – net savings of €350.
    Last edited by WDM1980; Dec 15, 2015, 10:21 AM.
    In the bag:
    R15 12° PXV 6.0
    SLDR 15° ATX Blue S
    Adams Pro 18° ATX, Idea Pro A12 20° NV S
    Titleist AP2 4-PW Project X 6.0
    Vokey SM5 54, 58
    Scotty Cameron Newport 2

  • #2
    Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

    Courses
    Set in the order I played them. (Name, Rack Rate, Golf Digest Ireland Rank)

    Strandhill Golf Club, €40, 70
    A golf course for the Irish, it’s cheap and it’s fun. The course starts on the top of a hill leading up to Knocknarea. You’ll be surrounded by chances for pics both of Knocknarea behind you and the Atlantic Ocean in front. Only a few blind shots, so you don’t have to play it twice to really get it. It’s down the hill to the water, then back up, and repeat. Some dunes, but you’ll never feel like a shot hit marginally off will be lost. The 7th runs along the beach with great views from the tees. Great value, greens aren’t perfect, but that’s what you get for the price.
    KM's Strandhill pics

    Enniscrone Golf Links (Dunes course), €90, 15
    This is a tough beast set next to the holiday town of Enniscrone. Set mostly among massive dunes next to the ocean, the course is full of blind shots and twisting holes to drive you crazy. If you miss the fairway you’ll be in the thickest, most ball hungry rough on the island – damp grass and moss abound; you could step on your ball and not find it. It’s not for the meek or wild driving. From Holes 5-8, you get a break as it runs parallel to the Scurmore 9 hole course – flat and relatively dune free. The remaining holes have you weaving around the dunes. Holes 11-13 I called crazy corner – a scary par 3 and two blind tee shots on dog leg par 4s. Holes 15-18 are great. Get your best pic from the 17th tee box looking back at 16, send it to your golf buddies, they will swear at you.
    KM's Enniscrone Pics

    Carne Golf links (Golf Chursa an Chairn), €90, 16
    Tom Coyne said this was his favourite course on the island; many agree with him that it’s the best. It’s surely a beauty that I will visit again, I’m not sure about the best, but up there.
    All three 9s seemingly have the same approach to design – they found these crazy dunes, cut the grass and put flag in the midst of a quasi-flat spot. The course is wild - up and down, left and right, blind shots off the tee and to the green, and plenty of challenge. Land your ball in the wrong spot and you’ll have a blind shot up a dune that seems as tall as Toronto’s skyline. The rough is tough, but not as wild as Enniscrone’s; the fairways seemed a touch more forgiving. Views near the ocean and from the many high points on the course are amazing – those dunes are tall and provide panoramic vistas that mean you don’t care where your shot ends up.
    Hacket course (opened 1993) – the original 18 – the front 9 is much more subtle and tame than the back. Anywhere else, it would be a spectacular 9 holes, but it’s followed by the back 9 and that makes it seem rather ordinary. The back 9 provides much more elevation changes, tougher shots, and greater views as it goes out along the ocean and into the highest point in the dunes.
    Kilmore 9 (opened 2013) – this new 9 starts between the front and back and crosses the back 9 between and over the same tall dunes. The holes are wild and terrifying at times – the 213 yard par 3 7th has you teeing off from the top of a dune to a green a top the same dune, with only the walking path connecting the two. It’s not an island, but may as well be one – I wasn’t going to climb/fall down 30m of dune going after a ball.
    Conditions on all three 9s were similar – not lush and green, but like all links very firm. The greens weren’t in the best shape – multiple grasses seems to have taken hold making putting tough at times.
    KM's Carne pics

    Donegal Golf Club (Murvagh), €70, 20
    Murvagh, as it’s known locally is a pleasant, relatively flat, and much more forgiving course than Carne and Enniscrone. There is a barrier of dunes which block the view of the sea from most holes, though you can usually hear the waves just beyond. With the absence of dunes to weave around, the course is far less intimidating than others. It felt more like a pure links course rather than a wild ride through the dunes as it has all of the characteristics of a links with the undulating and fast fairways leading to firm greens protected by pot bunkers. You can score well, but need to be creative in your approach to the greens and you must keep the tee shots in the fairway. From the 6th tee on top of the dune, you have a great view over Donegal Bay – look at the oyster farm only a few hundred yards away and remember that as you try the oysters at Castle Bar in Donegal Town (the course is called Donegal, the Town is Donegal, the county is Donegal – leads to some confusion at times.) The club house is nice with the restaurant on the second floor able to see the entire course.
    KM's Donegal Pics

    Narin and Portnoo Golf Club, €75, 33
    Like Donegal, Narin and Portoo is relatively flat and somewhat protected from the ocean by a barrier of dunes. The rough is still tough and you must keep your shots online. Views from the 9th tee are great, just don’t forget that you’re shooting OVER the 8th green towards the fairway and are totally blind to the 9th green. The course was lengthed some years ago to a par 72; that involved stretching out the back 9 with 4 par 5s including 3 consecutive through 13-15. The views off of 15 tee that curves around the beach will be among the best golf photos anywhere. Conditioning was ok, but some patchy spots on the greens were annoying. Narin’s clubhouse is simple without the great views, but the food is amazing – more people came in for the food on Friday evening than came to play golf during the day.
    KM's Narin and Portnoo pics

    Cruit Island (Gailf Chumann Oilean Na Cruite), €15 (9 holes, €25 day), NA
    Go to an island just a little left after the middle of nowhere; at the far tip of the island, on the most unlevel rocky section, put a golf course; people will come to play. That’s Cruit Island Golf Club (Cruit pronounced “Critch”). Whenever I mentioned my planned route, every golfer who knew of the course, and even some non-golfers, told me I had to check the place out. They were right. I wish I could’ve played there all day. “Easy,” “straight forward,” and “simple” do not describe the course at all. “Wild,” “fun,” and “crazy” fit much better. The blind shots on 5 holes scare you and have you guessing at clubs the first time around and the 6th hole par 3 is all carry from one rocky peninsula over another, to the green surrounded by the Atlantic – I didn’t even mind the 3 putt bogie. It was such fun, I wish I’d stayed all day for the extra €10.
    KM's Cruit Island Pics

    Rosapenna Golf Resort (Sandy Hills), €70, 25
    I hadn’t intended on playing here, but Portsalon GC was booked solid for the afternoon, so I went to nearby Rosapenna Golf resort instead. A full out North American-styled resort with its hotel attached, Rosapenna stood out among all the courses I visited, and not in a good way. Once you make your way to the “Golf Pavillion” – which sounds like part of a Disney resort – you can wander into the golf shop where a disinterested staff member will take your money and send you on your way. Every other course seemed genuinely happy to see me and found me a game. Rosapenna’s golf staff told me “the course is empty, no other players, sorry.” Even the food in the expansive lounge seemed devoid of character. The place had no soul; that made it feel less like I was playing in Ireland and more like a tired resort. Golf pavilion experience aside, the course was good. The Sandy Hills Links is the newer 18 hole course alongside a Tom Morris 1893 design. It weaves its way through the dunes – definitely a resort course with wider, more forgiving fairways and fewer blind shots than most courses. The conditioning was fine, but the sand in the bunkers seemed odd, like it wasn’t native to a damp links course. Rosapenna recently purchased the St Patrick’s links directly adjacent to the resort. It’s been closed a few years now, but will be added to their collection giving them a total of 63 holes on the property.
    KM's Rosapenna Pics
    Last edited by WDM1980; Sep 23, 2015, 02:21 PM.
    In the bag:
    R15 12° PXV 6.0
    SLDR 15° ATX Blue S
    Adams Pro 18° ATX, Idea Pro A12 20° NV S
    Titleist AP2 4-PW Project X 6.0
    Vokey SM5 54, 58
    Scotty Cameron Newport 2

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

      Royal Portrush Golf Club, £180, 3
      The once and future site of the Open Championship and ranked 16th in the world was also the most expensive stop on my trip by far. It would’ve been a close second (for price) to Royal County Down, but I couldn’t get a time there. Portrush seems rather ordinary at first – a nice club house and locker room, but not Royally nice. The starter’s building changes that impression. The red blazer with club tie and grey pants donned by the starter and the caddies milling about give it a formal “you just paid a royal sum to be here” atmosphere.
      The course is tough; rough comes in right where you don’t want it to and the green complexes seem to ensure balls bounce anywhere but onto the green. I played in the only really foul weather day of my trip – persistent rain for 6 holes and a stiff wind after the rain stopped. It lacks the views from vistas of some dunes courses and doesn’t run along the beach, but the challenge of the course is undeniable. The opening and closing holes were straight away par 4s with plenty of risk / reward opportunity that seems to come with major venues. There are few blind shots here, only tough lies, tight approaches, and punishing to mishits.
      KM's Portrush Pics

      Portstewart Golf Club (Strand course), £110, 18
      Located a few minutes from Portrush, my final stop, Portstewart managed to be my favourite all around experience - probably because I was paired with some members who put together a fun match. The golf staff set me up with a last minute game with a few members who warmly welcomed me to their group. From the high first tee, the views across the dunes are stunning. The course meanders through the dunes, though it lacks the wild twists and elevation changes of Carne and Enniscrone. Everything about it is well balanced. It’s tough but not excessively punishing; it requires well placed drives to setup the ideal approach, but you can still be creative and make a decent score without the perfect shots. The ebb and flow of the course won’t frustrate you and wear you down. The modern club house and facilities are beautiful but the club keeps the welcoming Irish charm. With two other courses on the property, this seems to be a stop suited for everyone.
      KM's Portstewart Pics

      Here are my biased, completely unscientific top 3 rankings. (edited after a few months of thinking back)

      Best Overall (The experience I think back to the most.)
      1. Carne
      2. Cruit
      3. Enniscrone

      Most Fun (The course that will leave you smiling, laughing, and telling stories.)
      1. Cruit
      2. Carne
      3. Portstewart

      Best Value
      1. Cruit (€25 for the day!!)
      2. Donegal
      3. Carne

      Hardest
      1. Royal Portrush
      2. Enniscrone
      3. Carne
      Last edited by WDM1980; Aug 5, 2016, 11:02 AM.
      In the bag:
      R15 12° PXV 6.0
      SLDR 15° ATX Blue S
      Adams Pro 18° ATX, Idea Pro A12 20° NV S
      Titleist AP2 4-PW Project X 6.0
      Vokey SM5 54, 58
      Scotty Cameron Newport 2

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

        Very cool.
        In The Ping Moonlite:
        TM M2 15* w/ 757 TS X
        TM M2 19* w/ 869 TS X
        Titleist 690.CB 4/6/8/PW
        Vokey TVD 54*
        Odyssey Tank V-Line

        Home Club - Cutten Fields

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

          Let me be the first to say I commend you for taking such a trip solo and doing it the way you did.

          Let me also be the first to say that I believe you played some of the best golf in all of the UK and Ireland in one of my favourite areas for golf in the world.

          The North West is completely awesome and I can't wait to get back. For now, your post brought back so many great memories and will hold me off.

          Thanks for one of the more awesome posts on TGN ever.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

            excellent read, thanks for posting
            What's in the TMX Stand Bag?

            10.5 SLDR w Diamana Flowerband X-flex
            SLDR 15* 3W
            TM Rescue 17*
            SLDR 5H
            TM M2 4-PW
            CG15 52/60
            Rossa Monza Corza

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

              Great read and sounds like an awesome trip. I took several solo weekend trips to California this past summer and although I would not do it everytime there's something to be said about doing a golf trip your way and not haggling/arguing over accommodations, food, courses and everyone's budget

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                you summed it up perfectly.

                Where did you stay? Hotels or B&Bs?

                And how was the Guinness? I miss it terribly.

                Titleist Bags
                Ping G15 Driver 10.5
                Ping G25 3 Wood 15
                Ping G25 Hybrid 20
                Ping G25 Hybrid 23
                Ping I25 4-PW Steel
                Titleist SM4 50/54/58 Degree
                Scotty Cameron Tel3 OR
                Ping Anser (Original)
                Bushnell Z6

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                  Great read, thanks for sharing!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                    Bravo
                    Driver - Cobra F7
                    Fwy Metals - TM M2 3+5
                    Hybrids - TM SLDR 4+5
                    Irons - TM M4 6-AW
                    Wedges - King Cobra 54+58
                    Putter - Scotty GoLo5r

                    PAEUNGOO NAEMSAE

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                      Originally posted by PistolPete View Post
                      ... something to be said about doing a golf trip your way and not haggling/arguing over accommodations, food, courses and everyone's budget
                      Oh there was haggling between left brain and right brain - budget vs nice hotel/course and between desire to play and body saying "#uck no"

                      It was nice to have the flexibility to adjust the schedule as needed. That wasn't always good when I planned on getting breakfast/lunch between courses and didn't then ended up falling apart in the closing holes.

                      Originally posted by tasker View Post
                      Where did you stay? Hotels or B&Bs?

                      And how was the Guinness? I miss it terribly.
                      B&Bs exclusively - better rates and service, plus who doesn't love a full irish breakfast. The downside is if the B&B has a set breakfast time - if I planned to tee off at 830, but breakfast didn't start until 9, that's an issue.

                      Guinness tasted the same there; the local brews are actually quite good.
                      In the bag:
                      R15 12° PXV 6.0
                      SLDR 15° ATX Blue S
                      Adams Pro 18° ATX, Idea Pro A12 20° NV S
                      Titleist AP2 4-PW Project X 6.0
                      Vokey SM5 54, 58
                      Scotty Cameron Newport 2

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                        Great write up WDM - it's a shame you didn't get to play Portsalon as it's a great track.

                        Also, any reason for not heading to play Ballyliffin?

                        Also, for anyone thinking about going - Standhill and Enniscrone can be played together for about €150 - along with County Sligo GC as part of the Sligo Links Golf Pass

                        http://www.golf.discoverireland.ie/G...aspx?tid=86147
                        TM AeroBurner 1 Driver 10.5 degree
                        Callaway Razr Hawk 3W
                        TM Rocketballz Stage 1 5W
                        Nike Vapor Flex Hybrid 4H 23
                        TM Rocketballz Stage 1 5I-PW
                        Cobra Tour Trusty 52-8/56-8
                        Performer High Loft 64
                        Taylor Made Ghost 35" putter

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                          Originally posted by IrishGuy1979 View Post
                          Great write up WDM - it's a shame you didn't get to play Portsalon as it's a great track.

                          Also, any reason for not heading to play Ballyliffin?

                          Also, for anyone thinking about going - Standhill and Enniscrone can be played together for about €150 - along with County Sligo GC as part of the Sligo Links Golf Pass

                          http://www.golf.discoverireland.ie/G...aspx?tid=86147
                          I just couldn't fit Ballyliffin in the schedule - had I known Portsalon was booked, I would've headed up to Ballyliffin instead.

                          That links pass is available to GUI members only - you need to be a member of a GUI golf club and have established a GUI handicap in order to be a full member.
                          Last edited by WDM1980; Sep 24, 2015, 03:39 PM.
                          In the bag:
                          R15 12° PXV 6.0
                          SLDR 15° ATX Blue S
                          Adams Pro 18° ATX, Idea Pro A12 20° NV S
                          Titleist AP2 4-PW Project X 6.0
                          Vokey SM5 54, 58
                          Scotty Cameron Newport 2

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                            Ah yeah - my brother is a member of the GUI so that's how I got one
                            TM AeroBurner 1 Driver 10.5 degree
                            Callaway Razr Hawk 3W
                            TM Rocketballz Stage 1 5W
                            Nike Vapor Flex Hybrid 4H 23
                            TM Rocketballz Stage 1 5I-PW
                            Cobra Tour Trusty 52-8/56-8
                            Performer High Loft 64
                            Taylor Made Ghost 35" putter

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: A solo trip to Ireland's North West

                              Thanks for this, great memories

                              Comment


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