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Club Gapping - Do you do it? And how often?

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  • #31
    I try and go to CarrickMacross on a regular at least a few times of year to dial back in my distances, mostly on wedges, but, also up to my six iron.

    I spend a lot of time using my gps watch to get distances from the pins and walk towards the hole taking multiple shots from prescribed distances from about 130 yards out to about 60 yards to “recalibrate” or at least reconfirm my distances.

    It helps to give confidence in my approach shots from specific distances. When playing, I imagine myself back at CarrickMacross playing that “perfect” 100 yard pitch to the middle of their tiny greens. On a good day, if things are dialed in, I can get some pretty good results.

    One of my playing partners has taken to this routine as well. Not long into our regular games, it becomes apparent who recently went for practice.

    Fortunately there are no rules limiting the number of golf balls you can carry during a match!

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    • #32
      It's not a complete waste of time, especially is you are doing what Andy does and adjusting your lofts to proper/required gaps.

      However, I question the utility and application to the golf course other than knowing how far you hit said club off a perfect lie, in perfect conditions indoors. One Never plays in perfect conditions , with no wind, a flat lie, a perfect lie on the golf course....not to mention the average golfer ( even those with as low as single digit index like myself = 4.6) are not consistent enough ball strikers. I can hit a 7iron 140 one shot and 165 on another in the same round.

      That research shows over 90% of golfer's approaches come up short of their target suggests that they should just add one more club , so maybe know how far you hit the ball then always add 1 club might be the best strategy to better scoring?
      "Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it happened "

      Comment


      • #33
        I agree with Weirfan about being realistic with the club gapping process.

        I think there's two schools of thought about club gapping. I suppose one is the true definition of club gapping where the gaps in between clubs might be 20 yards and tweak the loft of their clubs to deal with 30-40 yard gaps between clubs. But even with an impressive handicap as Weirfan has, he's still able to recognize that we have inconsistencies in our distances (or we are ignorant of our true distances)

        My definition of club gapping is strictly to get more accurate carry numbers. My club distances go from 70 yards for my 56 degree wedge and 225 yards with my driver (on a good day). As an 18 handicapper (typical of most weekend golfers?), the gap between my clubs is about 10 yards +/- 5 yards. There's no way that i'm even closely thinking about making any changes to my iron lofts - it wouldn't make sense. But at least, i know a bit better which club to hit in order to hit middle of the green (or a bit closer to the pin)

        For readers in a similar situation as mine, i would not recommend going through the intimidating (and expensive) process of proper club gapping - due to inconsistencies in our distances. But i do encourage readers who share a similar handicap to spend the $40 for an hour of simulator to get proper carry distances. I wish this for my golf buddy in 2022 whose typical club selection for a par 5 is driver, hard 7 iron, regular 7 iron, easy 7 iron, chip 7 iron, putt, putt, putt.

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        • #34
          I like to say “keep clubbing up until you start complaining about going long”. As Weirfan stated, most of us hacks are chronically short of our target.

          On a somewhat related note, as a putter, 4 out of 5 putts of mine don’t make it to the hole -> that’s a fault I am very cognizant of but can’t seem to will myself to hit my putts harder. What a silly game !
          WITB: Sun Mountain 5.5LS
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          Titleist TSi2 21* and 24* hybrid with Evenflow White 90
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          • #35
            Originally posted by ARL67 View Post

            On a somewhat related note, as a putter, 4 out of 5 putts of mine don’t make it to the hole -> that’s a fault I am very cognizant of but can’t seem to will myself to hit my putts harder. What a silly game !
            It is a mathematical certainty that you will make zero percent of the putts that don't reach the hole.

            Leaving your putts hole high or past the hole is the single easiest and guaranteed way to automatically sink more putts , best thing ....no practice is required
            "Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it happened "

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            • #36
              ^^^ you are off by 1%
              I thought Trevino said that only 99% of putts that are short don't go in the hole

              It's funny how mentally we can't execute such "simple things" as hitting putts past the hole.
              WITB: Sun Mountain 5.5LS
              Titleist TSi2 10* with Ventus Red Velocore 6
              Titleist TSi2 15* fairway with Evenflow White 65

              Titleist TSi2 21* and 24* hybrid with Evenflow White 90
              Titleist T200 5-GW with Steelfiber i95cw
              Cleveland RTX4 54* & 58* with Steelfiber i110cw
              Seemore Platinum M7 Tour with SS Flatso 3.0
              Set #2: MP-18 MMC 5-PW with Steelfiber i95cw

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Weirfan View Post
                It's not a complete waste of time, especially is you are doing what Andy does and adjusting your lofts to proper/required gaps.

                However, I question the utility and application to the golf course other than knowing how far you hit said club off a perfect lie, in perfect conditions indoors. One Never plays in perfect conditions , with no wind, a flat lie, a perfect lie on the golf course....not to mention the average golfer ( even those with as low as single digit index like myself = 4.6) are not consistent enough ball strikers. I can hit a 7iron 140 one shot and 165 on another in the same round.

                That research shows over 90% of golfer's approaches come up short of their target suggests that they should just add one more club , so maybe know how far you hit the ball then always add 1 club might be the best strategy to better scoring?
                Well I think that's why its important to get a baseline of data so that when you get on the course you take the other factors into consideration. If you know you hit your 7 iron 165 yards then you can take lie, wind, weather etc into consideration when making the shot. I agree that most rec golfers over estimate because they usually remember the really good shots not the bad ones. But if you take an average carry distance over a number of shots that can only help you in my opinion.

                I mean knowing your carry distances off a launch monitor (using the ball you use on a course) is going to be more accurate than going to a driving range where the conidtions can be varied, also range balls are going to make the results inconsistent as well.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by ryan151 View Post

                  Well I think that's why its important to get a baseline of data so that when you get on the course you take the other factors into consideration. If you know you hit your 7 iron 165 yards then you can take lie, wind, weather etc into consideration when making the shot.
                  In theory this makes sense but IMO and experience 98% of golfers:
                  1. Do not Make a consistent enough strike shot to shot
                  2. are not at all capable of accurately determining how much the wind ( behind or into) slope of the fairway , thickness of the rough, temperature etc impacts there distances.

                  as such, its a nice exercise but unless you are a PGA pro or incredibly consistent striker/player on every shot its really not much use. Like I said earlier, I am a 4.6 handicap and have a general idea how far each club goes but nowhere near consistent enough to hit exact yardages. On a good day might hit 1- 2 approaches that land exactly where I intended. At a 4.6 I hit 8 greens in reg a round on average, how many more greens will a 10-15-20 capper hit after doing this exercise ? Likely zero

                  it is a cheap and easy thing to do so there is no harm anyways.
                  "Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it happened "

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Gwelfgulfer View Post
                    Have never done it, not sure I will ever get around to doing it. I hit balls on the range that give me a 'basic' number. When on a course with some room or go later in the day, I'll laser off distances and hit multiple balls. I also play equipment that doesn't give me drastic changes in launch and spin, so everything is going to be relatively close to the same for years on end.

                    I think I've played basically the same guess yardages for over 10 years now and I don't foresee any huge drop off in iron distances even now at ocean level. But even still, just take old numbers and just subtract 10% or so and have it all close to real world again.
                    Just noticed you’re in PEI now, Ken. Must be some nice tracks out there!

                    - Phil

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Weirfan View Post

                      In theory this makes sense but IMO and experience 98% of golfers:
                      1. Do not Make a consistent enough strike shot to shot
                      2. are not at all capable of accurately determining how much the wind ( behind or into) slope of the fairway , thickness of the rough, temperature etc impacts there distances.

                      as such, its a nice exercise but unless you are a PGA pro or incredibly consistent striker/player on every shot its really not much use. Like I said earlier, I am a 4.6 handicap and have a general idea how far each club goes but nowhere near consistent enough to hit exact yardages. On a good day might hit 1- 2 approaches that land exactly where I intended. At a 4.6 I hit 8 greens in reg a round on average, how many more greens will a 10-15-20 capper hit after doing this exercise ? Likely zero

                      it is a cheap and easy thing to do so there is no harm anyways.
                      You must have a world class short game.
                      TXG Custom King Cobra F9 9.5* , Accra FX 140 2.0 M2
                      TXG Custom King Cobra F9 14.5*,Accra FX 140 2.0 M3
                      TXG Custom Cobra King Ltd. 5-wood 17.5*, Accra FX 140 2.0 M2
                      TXG Custom T. Made SIM Max 7-wood, Accra FX 140 2.0 M2
                      TXG Custom Mizuno CLK 23*, Tensei Red CK 60 R
                      TXG Custom Mizuno JPX 919 Hot Metal 6-pw, 1* up, Recoil E460 R + 1/2"
                      TXG Custom Mizuno T20, 50/07, 56/10, 60/07, Nippon 950H Neo
                      TXG Custom King Cobra Nova, 25 gram weights, Garson non-taper grip

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by rgk5 View Post

                        You must have a world class short game.
                        Short game is above average. Putting is very good. I play the same course 70% of the time and that familiarity makes a big difference to short game

                        my average score this season was a few decimal points above 80.

                        on average if I miss 10 greens make 2 birdies and get up and down 3/10 times that puts me at 77. Differential of 5.7 which is probably a more accurate index for me.

                        My cap is lower than my ability simply because I had a great streak late in the season with 18 straight sub 80 rounds my index dropped 2 full points from late September. My average h/c on season was 6.3.

                        Click image for larger version

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                        Last edited by Weirfan; Jan 3, 2022, 10:56 AM.
                        "Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it happened "

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Weirfan View Post

                          In theory this makes sense but IMO and experience 98% of golfers:
                          1. Do not Make a consistent enough strike shot to shot
                          2. are not at all capable of accurately determining how much the wind ( behind or into) slope of the fairway , thickness of the rough, temperature etc impacts there distances.

                          as such, its a nice exercise but unless you are a PGA pro or incredibly consistent striker/player on every shot its really not much use. Like I said earlier, I am a 4.6 handicap and have a general idea how far each club goes but nowhere near consistent enough to hit exact yardages. On a good day might hit 1- 2 approaches that land exactly where I intended. At a 4.6 I hit 8 greens in reg a round on average, how many more greens will a 10-15-20 capper hit after doing this exercise ? Likely zero

                          it is a cheap and easy thing to do so there is no harm anyways.
                          I agree with the first part, disagree with the second.

                          If your miss is both short and long you still need a starting point. If you are not confident in your number you are going to be even worse off.

                          Perfect example is a green that you have to carry the water and a front pin. An average golfer that doesn't know their numbers is lost, and average golfer the knows their thin, pure and slight miss numbers can play the slight miss number to the pin. The other two would both be past the pin but dry and a avoid a penalty stroke, even if they are chipping back on.

                          Now, do they need loft adjustments to adjust a yard or two.... If it helps confidence, sure, a confident swing is usually better. If it doesn't affect confidence it won't help much. Aiming for the middle of the green will lower scores much more (but not as fun).

                          To me the best way to dial in gapping is on grass with trackman. Hit a dozen shots or more with each club and track for averages, not you pure shot. Obviously adjust for conditions on the course and even if you aren't great at that, half a clue is better than no clue.

                          If you feel completely off the day you do it, throw out the information and do it again another day when you are swinging normal (not great, you are not after career numbers).

                          Our lack of consistency is for sure going to make the information less precise and useful than for a tour player, but I would still rather have a starting point.

                          The other option if you really want to stick to "real" numbers is to get Arcos. It will tell your exact numbers on the course. The problem with it is you need a big enough sample size of mostly good shots, otherwise you end up playing for a miss with some clubs and a pure'd shot with others and that just messes you up even more.

                          Get on trackman, adjust your lofts only if you think it will help you and enjoy know your numbers and when you hit them.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Weirfan View Post

                            Short game is above average. Putting is very good. I play the same course 70% of the time and that familiarity makes a big difference to short game

                            my average score this season was a few decimal points above 80.

                            on average if I miss 10 greens make 2 birdies and get up and down 3/10 times that puts me at 77. Differential of 5.7 which is probably a more accurate index for me.

                            My cap is lower than my ability simply because I had a great streak late in the season with 18 straight sub 80 rounds my index dropped 2 full points from late September. My average h/c on season was 6.3.

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	D6A7F9B3-A04D-4E82-AE82-456B2E1FC9F2.jpeg
Views:	77
Size:	70.0 KB
ID:	3485213
                            Good analysis.
                            TXG Custom King Cobra F9 9.5* , Accra FX 140 2.0 M2
                            TXG Custom King Cobra F9 14.5*,Accra FX 140 2.0 M3
                            TXG Custom Cobra King Ltd. 5-wood 17.5*, Accra FX 140 2.0 M2
                            TXG Custom T. Made SIM Max 7-wood, Accra FX 140 2.0 M2
                            TXG Custom Mizuno CLK 23*, Tensei Red CK 60 R
                            TXG Custom Mizuno JPX 919 Hot Metal 6-pw, 1* up, Recoil E460 R + 1/2"
                            TXG Custom Mizuno T20, 50/07, 56/10, 60/07, Nippon 950H Neo
                            TXG Custom King Cobra Nova, 25 gram weights, Garson non-taper grip

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by High cut View Post

                              I agree with the first part, disagree with the second.

                              If your miss is both short and long you still need a starting point. If you are not confident in your number you are going to be even worse off.

                              Perfect example is a green that you have to carry the water and a front pin. An average golfer that doesn't know their numbers is lost, and average golfer the knows their thin, pure and slight miss numbers can play the slight miss number to the pin. The other two would both be past the pin but dry and a avoid a penalty stroke, even if they are chipping back on.

                              Now, do they need loft adjustments to adjust a yard or two.... If it helps confidence, sure, a confident swing is usually better. If it doesn't affect confidence it won't help much. Aiming for the middle of the green will lower scores much more (but not as fun).

                              To me the best way to dial in gapping is on grass with trackman. Hit a dozen shots or more with each club and track for averages, not you pure shot. Obviously adjust for conditions on the course and even if you aren't great at that, half a clue is better than no clue.

                              If you feel completely off the day you do it, throw out the information and do it again another day when you are swinging normal (not great, you are not after career numbers).

                              Our lack of consistency is for sure going to make the information less precise and useful than for a tour player, but I would still rather have a starting point.

                              The other option if you really want to stick to "real" numbers is to get Arcos. It will tell your exact numbers on the course. The problem with it is you need a big enough sample size of mostly good shots, otherwise you end up playing for a miss with some clubs and a pure'd shot with others and that just messes you up even more.

                              Get on trackman, adjust your lofts only if you think it will help you and enjoy know your numbers and when you hit them.
                              100% agree about using tracknan outdoors off grass, same for fitting . The most accurate and and useful way versus indoors into a net/screen.

                              as for needing a starting point. Don’t we all have that already ? It comes from playing. We all know roughly how far we hit a club , at least I do and everyone I know does . I do agree with the person who said that people tend to use when they make a pure hit and their best as the number whereas that happens rarely with Ams. That is why 90% of amateur shoyt come up short. Doing a happing session won’t help that imo especially off perfect lies in perfect conditions. I know how far I hit every club wishing 10/15 yards., don’t need a gap session . If I’m having a poor ball striking day I take more club. We all have a laser or gpa so can measure every shot

                              also agree that Arcos is probably the best as it is real data from real conditions. I don’t use it but a friend does and telly gets into the analysis. There are also comparators to other golfers with the sMe h/c to gauge yourself. Big data base .

                              I think it is important to have your lofts and lies checked and adjusted to proper spec and also check each shaft flex . They differ from one to the next. Just did a set of irons for a guy and they weren’t out much 1-2 degrees here and there for loft
                              "Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it happened "

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                              • #45
                                Sorry about typos using phone
                                "Don't cry because it's over, Smile because it happened "

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