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What is the ruling here?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Ignatius Reilly View Post

    Tees, much more so than a plastic ball marker or small coin can really deflect or stop a ball if hit. Why allow them?
    Because they have traditionally been used for decades and there would be an uproar if they were banned.
    Obviously there hasn't been a significant number of problems that couldn't have been avoided by someone with a bit of sense.
    Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
    - Chi Chi Rodriguez

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Ignatius Reilly View Post

      Tees, much more so than a plastic ball marker or small coin can really deflect or stop a ball if hit. Why allow them?
      There's nothing stopping the players to ask for the marker to be moved as far as they want, so it does not affect their putt or vision.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Shadow View Post

        Ball Marker (2019)
        "An artificial object when used to mark the spot of a ball to be lifted, such as a tee, a coin, an object made to be a ball marker, or another small piece of equipment."

        A loose impediment, a scratch on the green, formerly permitted, will not be allowed post December 31.

        Rule 14.1a

        I know that rule. My question was which rule does NOT allow for using a tee or similar object to mark a ball. I have had this discussion when I've marked my ball with a tee, only to hear them say I can't mark my bal with something that punctures the surface of the green, or it has to be a coin or small round disc. All the while they are using their $100 Bellagio chip...

        (I am aware there is no rule)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by aaagc View Post

          Because they have traditionally been used for decades and there would be an uproar if they were banned.
          Obviously there hasn't been a significant number of problems that couldn't have been avoided by someone with a bit of sense.
          Maybe things are different over there, but over here where golf is still relatively new I don't see many people that use a tee as a ball mark. When they do, they often apologize for not being better prepared.

          I cannot imagine an uproar of any sort it they were banned, at least not here.

          Not all rule changes are in response to problems that could be avoided, some are just improvements and common sense.

          Originally posted by AjaxGolf View Post

          There's nothing stopping the players to ask for the marker to be moved as far as they want, so it does not affect their putt or vision.
          Yeah, but who needs the distraction and waste of time when it could be avoided? I thought we were trying to speed up the game.....

          I'm with you on the dumb Bellagio chip, but at least it sorta fits the "small coin or similar" description (except for small).
          "Confusion" will be my epitaph
          ...Iggy

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Ignatius Reilly View Post

            Not all rule changes are in response to problems that could be avoided, some are just improvements and common sense.

            Yeah, but who needs the distraction and waste of time when it could be avoided? I thought we were trying to speed up the game.....

            I'm with you on the dumb Bellagio chip, but at least it sorta fits the "small coin or similar" description (except for small).
            Yeah, they won't change the rules to ban tees and other unsuitable objects being used as ball markers, but they probably agonized for years over changing the drop level from shoulder-height to knee-height.
            Sage of the GTA...

            Comment


            • #21
              Dropping from shoulder height caused problems with re-drops and time. Tee peg markers are not a real problem
              Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
              - Chi Chi Rodriguez

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by aaagc View Post
                Dropping from shoulder height caused problems with re-drops and time. Tee peg markers are not a real problem
                I have no empirical evidence to either support or dispute your assertions regarding why the drop height was changed nor whether tee peg markers are a problem.

                My point was that putting a tee into the ground presents no less of an obstacle than did a bal. If a player wants to mark, lift and clean his own ball, then a tee is practical. However, if a player wants to reduce the potential for affecting the motion of another player's ball, then substituting a tee for a ball is not an effective means to do so.
                Sage of the GTA...

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by aaagc View Post
                  Dropping from shoulder height caused problems with re-drops and time. Tee peg markers are not a real problem
                  I see.

                  And anchored putting caused "real" problems?

                  "Confusion" will be my epitaph
                  ...Iggy

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Benz View Post

                    I have no empirical evidence to either support or dispute your assertions regarding why the drop height was changed nor whether tee peg markers are a problem.

                    My point was that putting a tee into the ground presents no less of an obstacle than did a bal. If a player wants to mark, lift and clean his own ball, then a tee is practical. However, if a player wants to reduce the potential for affecting the motion of another player's ball, then substituting a tee for a ball is not an effective means to do so.
                    1) This is the reason the USGA/R&A gave. See topic 17 here
                    http://www.usga.org/content/dam/usga...2019%20(1).pdf

                    2) But the other player can always have it moved and a referee is obliged to require it to be moved.
                    Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
                    - Chi Chi Rodriguez

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Ignatius Reilly View Post

                      I see.

                      And anchored putting caused "real" problems?
                      Not relevant to this topic
                      Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
                      - Chi Chi Rodriguez

                      Comment


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