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World Handicapping System - 2020 (next year!)

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  • Just thought I'd throw this in here, post also in Ontario Golf Lock Down more appropriate here, maybe.

    Meanwhile over in the UK they're more concerned about this.
    ​​​​​​​
    World Handicap System: 6 Things You may have Already Forgotten
    With golf back up and running, we all have more to get to grips with than the challenge of remembering how to hit a ball. We’ll also have a completely new handicapping system to come to terms with.
    Last November, the new World Handicap System (WHS) was implemented in the UK and Ireland but few of us had the chance to experience the changes it will make as winter and COVID regulations took us off course.
    Now, as we’ve all returned to the game, we’re going to play a first full season under WHS, and it will be interesting to see the effects.
    With the adoption of the WHS all golfers across the globe will be using the same handicapping system.
    The principal aim is to make handicapping easier to understand and transferable to any course anywhere in the world.
    Another principal objective of the WHS is for golfers’ handicaps to be more representative of current playing ability, as the system allows handicaps to be more fluid with its calculation based on average scoring rather than aggregate scoring, as per the old system.

    1 – Handicap Index
    This is, effectively, your new handicap that will be used as the basis for determining how many shots you receive on a given course, playing a given format.
    It’s calculated from an average of the best eight of your last 20 returned scores.
    When a new score is submitted, the Handicap Index is automatically recalculated and updated at the end of the day’s play, ready for use the following day.
    Players new to golf or looking to obtain a first handicap will need to submit scorecards amounting to 54 holes.
    From those, an initial Handicap Index will be provided.
    This will be altered when 20 scores have been submitted to deliver a fully developed Handicap Index.
    To prevent wild swings in handicap, the WHS provides caps – soft and hard – based on a player’s lowest Handicap Index in a one-year period.
    If a player’s handicap goes three shots above the low index, further rises are reduced by 50%. (Soft cap.)
    If a player’s handicap moves 5.0 strokes above the low index in a 12-month period, it cannot rise any further. (Hard cap.)
    Max handicap is 54 but that’s not quite the full story, you could play off a Course Handicap that is higher than that!
    2 – Course Handicap
    The Handicap Index, in conjunction with the difficulty of a course, gives a player their Course Handicap.
    This is how many shots you will actually receive playing any given course. This may vary depending on the tees you choose to play from.
    The difficulty of a course (off each teeing option) is calculated using Course Rating, Bogey Rating and Slope Rating – see below.
    3 – Course Rating, Bogey Rating and Slope Rating
    Course Rating is how many strokes a scratch golfer (someone with a Course Handicap of 0) should take on a course, off each sets of tees.
    Bogey Rating measures playing difficulty for a bogey golfer (someone with a handicap of roughly 20 for a man and 24 for a women).
    Knowing these two ratings allows WHS to determine the difficulty of the course and to produce a Slope Rating for each set of tees.
    Slope Rating is calculated by subtracting Course Rating from Bogey Rating and multiplying by 5.381 for men and 4.240 for women.
    Minimum Slope Rating is 55 for the easiest course up to 155 for the hardest courses.
    At a course where all players compete from their Handicap Index, Slope Rating is 113.
    The Course Handicap calculation is: Slope Rating divided by 113, multiplied by Handicap Index.
    4 – General Play is important but optional
    In order for the new system to be effective, it’s important that players record as many scores as possible for handicap calculations, General Play as well as competition. That way, Handicap Index is as representative as possible.
    A General Play score is a pre-registered social score from a course and tee that has a Course and Slope Rating for your gender, played to singles medal, Stableford, Par or Bogey format.
    But not every round needs to be counting. You have to select to pre-register before teeing off if you want it to count.
    If you haven’t pre-registered, a score cannot be submitted.
    5 – Conditions can still make a difference
    The system includes a “Playing Conditions Calculation” that looks at how all players who have entered a score on a course have performed on that day, off all tees, compared to their expected performance.
    At the end of each day’s play a Playing Conditions Calculation will be made by the system.
    6 – You don’t need to carry a calculator with you
    Although, on paper the system looks rather complicated with various calculations throughout; in reality, the golfer needn’t feel overwhelmed.
    The system will carry out the calculations for you.
    All you need to do is enter a competition or pre-register for General Play on a particular course, noting which tees you’re playing on, enter your scores, confirm and have them confirmed by a playing partner and submit – The system will update accordingly with any changes made ready for golf the following day.
    plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

    Comment


    • Originally posted by sikoram View Post
      Well, here we are. 1 March, waiting out a frost delay and Golf Canada has not changed our par values. Disappointing. We have put so much time and effort into evaluating our course and can't get some key strokes. On the bright side, we have a noon shotgun so I can do my thing. The course is recovering from mega flooding with all the bunkers being filled with sand and some still are full of water. We aren't talking Kananaskis here, but all the local courses were affected.
      Par values are recommended in the WHS handbook. They are set by the club.
      The Course Rating and Bogey Rating are set by your local rating authority. Slope is a function of the Course and Bogey ratings.
      Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
      - Chi Chi Rodriguez

      Comment


      • 4under --- I'll observe that the "new" (after 2019) course handicap calculation is a little more complicated than you described.

        A player now has a wider range of course handicaps between the longest and shortest teeing grounds, because the Course Rating is now included in the equation.

        Course handicap = Handicap Index * Slope Rating / 113 + Course Rating - Par
        Last edited by OKHC; May 14, 2021, 08:05 PM.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by OKHC View Post
          4under --- I'll observe that the "new" (after 2019) course handicap calculation is a little more complicated than you described.

          A player now has a wider range of course handicaps between the longest and shortest teeing grounds, because the Course Rating is now included in the equation.

          Course handicap = Handicap Index * Slope Rating / 113 + Course Rating - Par
          Simple.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by OKHC View Post
            4under --- I'll observe that the "new" (after 2019) course handicap calculation is a little more complicated than you described.

            A player now has a wider range of course handicaps between the longest and shortest teeing grounds, because the Course Rating is now included in the equation.

            Course handicap = Handicap Index * Slope Rating / 113 + Course Rating - Par
            The calculation in GB&I is
            Course handicap = Handicap Index * Slope Rating / 113
            Simpler.


            Don't ask.​​​​​​
            Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
            - Chi Chi Rodriguez

            Comment


            • Originally posted by aaagc View Post

              The calculation in GB&I is
              Course handicap = Handicap Index * Slope Rating / 113
              Simpler.


              Don't ask.​​​​​​
              We won't ask why it's different.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by OKHC View Post
                4under --- I'll observe that the "new" (after 2019) course handicap calculation is a little more complicated than you described.
                A player now has a wider range of course handicaps between the longest and shortest teeing grounds, because the Course Rating is now included in the equation.
                Course handicap = Handicap Index * Slope Rating / 113 + Course Rating - Par
                OK , OKHC, I did not describe any damn thing it was quoted directly from the UK's Golf Monthly.
                I don't actually play by any rules way too boring, anyways, hope it works for your OKHC.
                plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

                Comment


                • Originally posted by 4underthru9 View Post

                  OK , OKHC, I did not describe any damn thing it was quoted directly from the UK's Golf Monthly.
                  I don't actually play by any rules way too boring, anyways, hope it works for your OKHC.
                  One could ask that if you don't play by any rules, why are you reading/posting in a Rules forum?

                  Comment


                  • Hi; oh, yes, in GB&I, they decided for some reason, to use the 'old' course handicap equation. I hadn't noticed that 4under's post on May 14, was quoting a UK source. When I compare the old and new equations, I observe that the number of strokes that better player A, has to give to worse player B, is generally the same now as it was before. This makes me wonder why it was changed in the new system, and why the UK resisted being consistent with the rest of the world.

                    I'll observe also that rules and handicap discussions here are friendly. I sign into TGN 2 or 3 times a week; in the 'Local Pub', new (?) guy Maple Mania posts once per hour, and Sean Avery's output has declined to about once per 6 hours. Those Trump and Coronavirus discussions seem to be affecting mental health.

                    Comment


                    • Under the old USGA system, a player could expect to shoot better than his h/c around 25% of the time. Now that we are only counting the best 8 of 20, how often can a player expect to shoot better than his or her h/c. A quick look says that it now should only be 20% of the time. Is this a correct presumption?

                      Comment


                      • I put some numbers in Excel, and yes, 20% is about what shows up the most. This seems to be true even if a player:
                        • has a wide range of scores, or
                        • is more likely to have a bad-scoring day, than a good-scoring day.

                        Comment

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