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Play it as it lies, lays, lyes....HELP!

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Bailey View Post

    So if I write “ this is where I lay “ , and I am laying in that spot at the time , how does it become past tense ?
    Im not a linguist, so this is a question not a comment.
    Unless you are a hen, you are not laying in that spot. You might say, This is where I lay yesterday and today I lie again in the same spot.

    The different forms include .
    I lie down on the spot, meaning I am carrying out the action of lying down in the present.
    I lay down on the spot, meaning I carried out the action of lying down in the past.
    I am lying on the spot means that's where I am and what I am doing - a continuous situation in the present.
    I was lying on the spot means that's where I was and what I was doing - a continuous action in the past.

    Now just to make things confused, you can use lay to mean an action carried out on somebody or something in the present. For instance, a officer surrendering might say I lay my sword at your feet in a quaintly old world way. WH Auden used this form in this first line of a poem: Lay your sleeping head, my love.....

    But the past form of lay when used in this way is laid, as in I laid my sword at his feet.


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    • #17
      "Play it as it lays" is an ancient golf saying that owes more to the internal rhyme than it does to grammar.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ColinL View Post

        Unless you are a hen, you are not laying in that spot. You might say, This is where I lay yesterday and today I lie again in the same spot.

        The different forms include .
        I lie down on the spot, meaning I am carrying out the action of lying down in the present.
        I lay down on the spot, meaning I carried out the action of lying down in the past.
        I am lying on the spot means that's where I am and what I am doing - a continuous situation in the present.
        I was lying on the spot means that's where I was and what I was doing - a continuous action in the past.

        Now just to make things confused, you can use lay to mean an action carried out on somebody or something in the present. For instance, a officer surrendering might say I lay my sword at your feet in a quaintly old world way. WH Auden used this form in this first line of a poem: Lay your sleeping head, my love.....

        But the past form of lay when used in this way is laid, as in I laid my sword at his feet.

        Let me reread this a couple of times and I should be able to follow along , lol. Thanks.

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        • #19
          ‘Layed’ is a more complicated story. It is no longer a proper word. It is considered archaic. That is, it might still be used when someone is trying to create an old time feel, but nobody uses it outside of that.
          Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
          - Chi Chi Rodriguez

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          • #20
            lie still my ball, for they know not of what they spake.
            things change

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