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British 2nd World War Temporary Golf Rules

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  • British 2nd World War Temporary Golf Rules

    Hazards to be avoided.....potentially significant penalties involved.


    Fortunately there are no rules limiting the number of golf balls you can carry during a match!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Fore Warned View Post
    Hazards to be avoided.....potentially significant penalties involved.

    I assume you were linking to:

    https://www.therichmondgolfclub.com/wartime-rules/

    Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
    - Chi Chi Rodriguez

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    • #3
      Yes, that was it.

      Fortunately there are no rules limiting the number of golf balls you can carry during a match!

      Comment


      • #4
        The first known Rules of Golf were drawn up in 1744 in Edinburgh for the world's first 'open' golf competition at Leith by the Gentlemen Golfers of Edinburgh, who would go on to become The Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers.

        THE FIRST SET OF RULES OF GOLF

        Articles & Laws in Playing at Golf.

        1. You must Tee your Ball within a Club's length of the Hole.
        2. Your Tee must be upon the Ground.
        3. You are not to change the Ball which you Strike off the Tee.
        4. You are not to remove Stones, Bones or any Break Club, for the sake of playing your Ball, except upon the fair Green and that only within a Club's length of your Ball.
        5. If your Ball comes among watter, or any wattery filth, you are at liberty to take out your Ball & bringing it behind the hazard and teeing it, you may play it with any Club and allow your Adversary a Stroke for so getting out your Ball.
        6. If your Balls be found any where touching one another, You are to lift the first Ball, till you play the last.
        7. At Holling, you are to play your Ball honestly for the Hole, and not to play upon your Adversary's Ball, not lying in your way to the Hole.
        8. If you should lose your Ball, by it's being taken up, or any other way, you are to go back to the Spot, where you struck last, & drop another Ball, And allow your adversary a Stroke for the misfortune.
        9. No man at Holling his Ball, is to be allowed, to mark his way to the Hole with his Club, or anything else.
        10. If a Ball be stopp'd by any Person, Horse, Dog or anything else, The Ball so stop'd must be play'd where it lyes.
        11. If you draw your Club in Order to Strike, & proceed so far in the Stroke as to be counted a Stroke.
        12. He whose Ball lyes farthest from the Hole is obliged to play first.
        13. Neither Trench, Ditch or Dyke, made for the preservation of the Links, nor the Scholar's Holes, or the Soldier's Lines, Shall be accounted a Hazard; But the Ball is to be taken out teed /and play'd with any Iron Club.

        Putting isn't golf, greens should be treated almost the same as water hazards: you land on them, then add two strokes to your score.
        - Chi Chi Rodriguez

        Comment


        • #5
          Some were converted to RAF bases during the war such as Royal Dornoch

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