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  • Originally posted by bcampb00 View Post

    My question was about the younger demographic. Did you even read the article?
    Yes I did and they think Trudeau will probably win the next election . . . but we should worry about the 18-29 . . . at least it makes you feel good for now. You know there is still 2+ years, lots will change.
    If you think it's hard to meet new people, try picking up the wrong golf ball.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by bcampb00 View Post

      Can you explain the startling shift from the younger demographic away from the NDP to the Conservatives? I’m struggling.

      https://nationalpost.com/opinion/sab...t-singhs-lunch
      From the article:
      In January, 31 per cent of 18-29 year olds preferred the NDP. Now only 21 per cent do. Crucially, their votes didn’t go to the Liberals, whose support in this period declined by 1 point.
      So if I were an NDP supporter I could spin this multiple ways.

      What are the demographics (besides age) of those in the two polls?
      Can the 'chatter' regarding the Conservative leadership convention have created more publicity for that party?
      Is the 'switch' long or short term?

      Using personal anecdote, in high school a great many of my peers were NDP supporters.
      I was a hard core Progressive Conservative.

      That party as I knew it, no longer exists. It was 'taken over' by the Reform Party.

      As the saying goes, "when the facts change, I change my mind'.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Chambokl View Post

        Yes I did and they think Trudeau will probably win the next election . . . but we should worry about the 18-29 . . . at least it makes you feel good for now. You know there is still 2+ years, lots will change.
        I’m afraid you may have clicked on a faulty link. At no place in this article did it say they “think Trudeau will probably win the next election “. I have provided a fresh link below.

        https://nationalpost.com/opinion/sab...t-singhs-lunch


        I do feel good about this rather large cohort moving their support from the far left - makes me feel they have escaped the liberal indoctrination that public education and main stream media have become and they are thinking for themselves. A great reason to be hopeful about the future.

        There will be another election in 2 1/2 years or when Jag pulls the plug. I’d bet on the “under”.

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        • If the NDP keeps on losing support, there is no way Jag will pull the plug. I think he needs a couple more years to qualify for a very generous lifetime pension paid by US.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by bcampb00 View Post

            I do feel good about this rather large cohort moving their support from the far left - makes me feel they have escaped the liberal indoctrination that public education and main stream media have become and they are thinking for themselves. A great reason to be hopeful about the future.
            Actually, you got that backward . . . students think for themselves because of public education. They are actually not as dumb as you think. They are smart and decide what they wants . . . they might live a bit in fantasy land, but this is OK. Did you know that kid are not racist . . . their parents (usually) guide them toward this.

            Sit them in a park and watch 5 years old, most will play with every kids in the park . . . at school, students will usually repeat what their parents say at home, not always good.
            If you think it's hard to meet new people, try picking up the wrong golf ball.

            Comment


            • From John Ibbitson in The Globe

              The years of conservative rift and reunion, of Reformers and Progressive Conservatives and the Canadian Alliance and the reunited Conservative Party are ancient history. None of it matters any more. The Conservative Party is about to become the personal property of Pierre Poilievre.

              All available evidence suggests that the only remaining question is whether Mr. Poilievre will take the leadership on the first ballot. Fundraising numbers suggest he will, and by a lot.

              Support for Mr. Poilievre is growing outside the Conservative base. A recent Abacus poll has the Conservatives at 35 per cent support. (Online survey, 2,400 adults, taken July 22-27, with a margin of error of 2 per cent, 19 times out of 20.) Support for the Tories is mostly the result of voter weariness with the Liberal Party, David Coletto, CEO of Abacus, told me.

              Mr. Poilievre has vowed that his government would never legislate limits on abortion. His stand on LGBTQ issues is generally supportive. He supports high levels of immigration.

              For this writer, his opposition to vaccine mandates is deeply troubling. Other things he has gone on about, such as singing the praises of cryptocurrencies, are just weird.

              Comment


              • From The Globe & Mail

                Not only demonstrating the illogical 'hate' that seems to motivate the 'freedumb' group but also calling out Pierre Polievre regarding his speeches/pronouncements/campaign.

                Gary Mason - August 4, 2022

                This country appears to have gone mad – a portion of it, at least.

                And much of it seems directed at our public figures, particularly politicians, and more specifically Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

                Late last month, Mr. Trudeau visited Lone Oak Brewing, a brewpub on Prince Edward Island. “It’s not very often the Prime Minister and Alan Doyle show up for Friday lunch, but when they do, it sure is fun!” they posted on their social media feeds, along with a picture of Mr. Trudeau with musician Doyle. Routine, harmless stuff – or at least you would have thought.

                Instead, the posts incited a tsunami of online harassment and abuse from people who apparently despise the Prime Minister. And that wasn’t the end of it: The company later posted pictures on Facebook of one of its vans that had its windshield smashed in.

                The National Post reported in June that the Prime Minister had 59 threats made against him during the 40-day federal election in 2019. It didn’t get much better in 2021, where he was regularly met on the campaign trail with braying mobs screaming death threats and obscenities at him, and, in one case, where he was pelted by small rocks. And earlier this year, he cancelled a planned in-person appearance at a fundraiser in Surrey, B.C., because of aggressive protesters.

                NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh was surrounded by a mob in Peterborough, Ont., during a stop in the provincial election. Men and women alike were screaming horrible, vile things at him, in some cases just inches away from his face. He was whisked away in a waiting car before violence had a chance to potentially break out.

                The anger isn’t only being reserved for our elected politicians, either. Public-health officials like Dr. Bonnie Henry in B.C. have needed RCMP protection. And it was revealed this week that the Alberta government spent $262,000 in 2021 on security for the province’s chief medical health officer, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, because of the threats she was receiving.

                There is an element in our society that has ramped things up, and has become emboldened, feeling that they have almost been given permission to behave in this manner.

                Why is this stuff happening with more frequency? Is the anger that’s being directed at politicians, and in particular those who identify as progressive, something we’ve imported from the U.S.?

                Something is afoot. Social media and the internet broadly have become cesspools of hate, and when you wallow in such toxic waters it is easy to become intoxicated by anger and bitterness. People feed off of one another, too, so it doesn’t take long before you have a mob organizing to disrupt one of the Prime Minister’s public appearances, or to occupy the nation’s capital as the so-called freedom convoy did earlier this year.

                I also believe that certain politicians need to own some of what we are seeing. Pierre Poilievre, for instance, is the clear frontrunner to become the next leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. He has been a federal cabinet minister. He is not some random dude on the internet. When he talks, people listen, and lately, they have been listening in droves to the man.

                Yet in videos and speeches, Mr. Poilievre has blamed Justin Trudeau for almost every problem conceivable to man. He has blamed him for high gas prices, high housing costs, high grocery bills, even calling it “Justinflation.” He has blamed him for a lack of jobs and for spying on people. He’s blamed him for COVID-19 lockdowns and the carnage at our airports.

                Essentially, he has given people fodder to be really angry with the Prime Minister, even if the issues aren’t necessarily exclusively his fault. He’s surely convinced many of them that whatever problems they have are Mr. Trudeau’s responsibility – that he alone is to blame for the fact their lives are miserable. In that framing, why wouldn’t they be enraged?

                Mr. Poilievre may just say that that’s just politics, and some might agree – even if a good amount of the blame that he’s laid at Mr. Trudeau’s feet is misplaced or has been plainly dishonest.

                In today’s highly charged world, that is a dangerous game.

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